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Thread: Angelfish Biotope

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default Angelfish Biotope

    I just set up an Amazon theme tank which houses 6 Angelfish, some Ancistrus and some Corydoras Panda.

    This is the video

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zOBhN-birY0


    and some pictures









  2. #2
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    looking good. I always liked a balckwater setup.

  3. #3

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    Very cool! Are those real leaves?
    120G (72") with 29G sump/bio-tower, Emperor 400

    Iodotropheus Sprengerae 'Rusty', Metriaclima sp. 'Mbweca', Pseudotropheus Saulosi, Aulonocara Jacobfreibergi 'Otter Point', Cyrtocara Moorii, Labeotropheus Trewavasae 'Zimbabwe Rock', Ancistrus sp. 'Albino Bristlenose Pleco', Synodontis Multipunctatus

    My Tank

  4. #4
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    Yes, dried oak leafs.

  5. #5
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    Dang - will have to show my wife this. I would love to see her tank setup this way. You have a great eye for natural looking tanks!

    What sized tank is that?
    What substrate did you use?
    Is that Oak tree branches too?
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  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by pomi View Post
    Yes, dried oak leafs.
    Cool! I'm really interested to see how this tank develops and evolves over time.
    120G (72") with 29G sump/bio-tower, Emperor 400

    Iodotropheus Sprengerae 'Rusty', Metriaclima sp. 'Mbweca', Pseudotropheus Saulosi, Aulonocara Jacobfreibergi 'Otter Point', Cyrtocara Moorii, Labeotropheus Trewavasae 'Zimbabwe Rock', Ancistrus sp. 'Albino Bristlenose Pleco', Synodontis Multipunctatus

    My Tank

  7. #7
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    I have a few questions about this......your wood inside looks fairly new.......surely you cured this wood before you added it to your tank. I also am waiting for oak leaves to fall here in Michigan.....I have a blackwater tank are you using anything to treat them before you tossed them into the tank......your choice of music always is a nice......sets the mood. Do you use extract of any kind in the tank? Julie
    Last edited by PhishNFilly; 10-27-2010 at 10:00 PM. Reason: spelln
    WATER CHANGE/WATER CHANGE/WATER CHANGE <~~~ My Mantra!

  8. #8
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    The leaves worked well to darken your water but you should be careful not to let them stay in there for too long. They look cool but they will decompose quickly in water and become a real mess not to mention what that will do to your tanks bio-load.

    It looks nice but I don't think that is a good set-up for the long run.

  9. #9
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    Aug 2010
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    to why_spyder :

    size of tank is 180 liters
    substrate is river sand
    I don't know the type of the branches, just gathered them from a forest


    to PhishNFilly:

    the wood and leafs are just kept in very hot water in my bathtub for 24 hours, I never treat things I find in nature, away from human activity
    for the extra black-water effect I use JBL Tormec, which consist of active peat pellets, but the fresh wood and leafs also colors the waters

    to belxavier420:

    I know the leafs will decompose as the time goes by, but that lowers the pH and benefits the fish, by releasing humic acids, just like in the wild

    for the long run, I have gathered a great amount of extra leafs, to replace the old ones

  10. #10
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    Decomposition is the process by which something eats the leaves, animals and/or bacteria. In a very low pH situation, there is very little bacteria and decomposition is extremely slow. I've used oak leaves in a tank that were there for as much as a year and barely showing any decomposition. With decomposition that slow, pollution is not a concern. Do not use Maple leaves, however, as they have more sugar in them and decompose very quickly. Also, they will not acidify the water as much as oak does.

    As an example, I recently purchased some almond leaves to see if they were any better or worse than oak (As it turns out, they work about the same; the almond leaves just look more tropical). They were placed in two tanks about three months ago. In one tank they look like they did the day I put them in there. In the other, a population of the livebearing snails snuck in on some plants and have been eating away at the leaves, which are about 50%-60% consumed. Which not only proves that something has to consume the leaves, but that there are snails that will live in very acid waters!
    Happiness may be the door to Heaven,
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  11. #11
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    Very interesting, I really like the look of black water but I did not realize it was that easy to achieve. Looks like I will be keeping an eye out for oak trees as the leaves are now beginning to turn.

  12. #12
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    I assume people just dry them out and store them that way? I doubt you could vacuum seal them to keep them preserved, could you? (without crushing the leaves)
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  13. #13
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    You can dry them and seal them in plastic bags, I don't think a vacuum seal is necessary. I'd be careful about using heat to dry them, though!
    Happiness may be the door to Heaven,
    But Pleasure is not the Key.

  14. #14
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    I assume it would be safe to make a tea out of oak leaves to darken the water then?

  15. #15
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    I use blackwater extract by Tetra Aqua......I imagine it does the exact same thing. Julia
    WATER CHANGE/WATER CHANGE/WATER CHANGE <~~~ My Mantra!

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