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Thread: Neolamprologus multifasciatus tank!

  1. #1
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    Default Neolamprologus multifasciatus tank!

    Today I am setting up my shell tank! 20 gallon long full of sand and shells, a few plastic plants and some Neolamprologus multifasciatus. I'll post some pics when it is all set up. Can't wait, these guys are pretty cool!
    Festae, Ornatum and Fronts, Oh my!

  2. #2
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    Ok, scratch that..lol..it was a 15 gallon tank..and I didn't like the plants. As soon as the water clears up, the fish are going in and I will take some pictures.

    I used water from my 180 and filter medium from an established filter to set up the shell tank.
    Festae, Ornatum and Fronts, Oh my!

  3. #3
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    SO I went to my LFS and got 5 multi's. they gave me all the shells in the tank for free! Turns out..there were 6 multi's..lol. One just popped out...and it is a decent sized male.
    Festae, Ornatum and Fronts, Oh my!

  4. #4
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    Default







    Festae, Ornatum and Fronts, Oh my!

  5. #5
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    You'll need 50 - 100 more shells to cover the bottom. Don't worry too much about arranging the shells, they will set it up they way they want. You can attach anubius or java fern to a couple of shells for sight line breakup.

    You can get escargot shells from a local gourmet food store or on-line at amazon etc.

    I use whale eye shells from here:
    http://www.cichlidbreeding.com/products.php?cat=10

    I feed my similis NLS growth food. It is important to get a good growth of brown algae/diatoms on the shells as this will help provide food for the fry because as you will find they are small and plentiful.

    I enjoy watching my shellie tanks most. There's always something going on!

    Regards,
    -Gary

  6. #6
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    yeah, I was looking at getting a jar of shells from a gourmet food store. I'll have the bottom covered in shells in a few days. I figure they will be OK for now..Thanks for the advice!
    Festae, Ornatum and Fronts, Oh my!

  7. #7
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    Ok, shells ordered, they will be here Wednesday. I got 72 shells coming!
    Festae, Ornatum and Fronts, Oh my!

  8. #8
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    Nov 2008
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
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    Nice.
    75 Gal
    1-Yellow Lab
    2-Blue Acei
    3-Blue Zebras
    5-Metriaclima Zebra (OB)
    lots of "Hybrids"
    1-Royal Pleco
    2 - Pictus Catfish

    125 Gal
    Tropical Community tank
    2 - Pictus Catfish
    1-Synodontis Eupterus
    1-Synodontis Catfish
    2-Marble Plecos

  9. #9
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    Mar 2009
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    Neenah, Wi.
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    Nice. Your LFS gave you some pretty big shells. Fish look great.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by baytherman View Post
    Nice. Your LFS gave you some pretty big shells. Fish look great.
    I told them about the bonus fish, even offered to pay for it, but they declined. I have a bunch of shells arriving tomorrow so the bottom of the tank will be pretty much covered in shells and they can pick and choose their new homes, etc.

    My only question is the fry. There will be fry. How do you get them out with that many shells without tearing down the entire tank? Granted, it isn't a big tank, but the disruption factor has to be pretty high.

    Also, anyone know what kind of cat would go well with them? Possibly one that would eat some fry and keep the tank clean?
    Festae, Ornatum and Fronts, Oh my!

  11. #11
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    Synodontis petricola or Synodontis lucipinnis might be worth considering. Both are similar looking with S. lucpinnis being a bit smaller still. Perhaps someone else will chime in with other suggestions.

  12. #12
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    Hollywood Florida
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    My only question is the fry. There will be fry. How do you get them out with that many shells without tearing down the entire tank? Granted, it isn't a big tank, but the disruption factor has to be pretty high.
    You really won’t need to remove the fry since they will live among the adults and previous siblings. As they grow, should you wish to remove some of the juvies, watch which shells they go into and remove the shell. There are tricks (elevating the shells above the substrate) you can find on forums to get them out of the shells. You will find the charm of keeping multies or similis as opposed to most other shellies is the way they live as a colony.

    Also, anyone know what kind of cat would go well with them? Possibly one that would eat some fry and keep the tank clean?
    I don’t keep any cats in my shellie tanks. They do a good job of keeping the tank clean by patrolling the shell bed looking for food. I do a 25% water change once a week, including just lightly hovering over the shells. Surprisingly, the tank stays relatively clean of excess debris.

    Synodontis cats are best kept in groups, so a single cat in a small tank might not be your best approach. I originally kept a small compressiceps in with my similes but as the colony got larger, the similis kept it pinned in a corner but I’m sure it got it’s share of fry.
    A single altolamprologus or a dwarf julidochromis (ornatus, transcriptus or dickfeldi), living in a pile of rocks in one of the tank’s corners might be a better option. IMHO…leave the multies by themselves and let them do their thing.

    Regards,
    -Gary

  13. #13
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    Thanks for the advice Gary, I will just let them do their thing.
    Festae, Ornatum and Fronts, Oh my!

  14. #14
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    Mar 2010
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    Gary,

    My tank bottom will be entirely covered in shells. Someone on another forum mentioned Java Moss and you mentioned Java Fern. Would you say yes or no to Java Moss? I was also told algae growth over the shells is ideal, is this true? If so, how do you promote algae growth?

    Thanks for your help!
    Tom
    Festae, Ornatum and Fronts, Oh my!

  15. #15
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    Tom,

    Would you say yes or no to Java Moss?
    Plants of any kind are not a necessity, it is mainly for aesthetics. Any low light plant (require less than 2 watts per gallon to survive) that can exist in hard water (high ph) conditions, will be fine. Which ever you choose, java moss, java fern or anubius, will be ok, it is simply a matter of which one you prefer.

    You will find multies, like similes, like to dig and will build large sand piles while excavating underneath and between the shell bed. They will dig down until they hit glass so the fry can use the nooks and crannies to hide in.

    Just because you like a plant in a certain place does not necessarily mean they will like it and might very well move or bury it. My experience with similes is that they do not eat or damage the plants in any way.
    If so, how do you promote algae growth?
    If you shoot for 1.5 – 2 watts per gallon of light, that will be sufficient to keep the plants alive and grow a good cover of algae/diatoms on the tops of the shells and on the side and rear glass. A couple of rocks scattered around would also provide a surface for algae/ diatom growth, which could be grazed on by the colony. River rocks work well for this, the small pits and dimples provide a good ‘bite’ for this growth.

    Regards,
    -Gary

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