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Thread: More office tank questions

  1. #1
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    Default More office tank questions

    I've been working out the details of putting a tank in my office (the initial thread is below). I have gotten the furniture, etc., set up now so that I can probably get a 90 or 120 w/stand & canopy (it will have a higher budget than my home tanks, since it IS supposed to look professional). Today, while looking at some tanks, one of the clerks) who actually knows something about what he's talking about) at my lfs gave me his opinion that either hob or sump would work fine, but he might recommend a drilled tank w/sump for an office environment, simply because it would allow the tank to be closer to the wall, and would look a little better. I'm leaning towards a sump, esp. if I go for the 120, but hadn't thought about a drilled tank. I guess it would allow better placement, although at greater cost. Any other thoughts on what factors I might want to weigh in setting up this tank?

    Also, he's pushing Tanganyika, since I have a mbuna tank at home. The advice that makes more sense to me is to go with what I know best when doing a workplace tank, to minimize problems/time spent working on the tank. I'm leaning towards stocking with just a different group of mbuna, since there are always fish that I want, but have no room for. I guess I should ask in the Tang section why I would want to do that .

    Any feedback/opinions will be greatly appreciated!
    Luckiest guy on the planet.

  2. #2

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    Tang or Malawi.... just get what ever you like the most. I'm biased in favor of Malawi, so I think that some colorful active mbuna will impress non-hobbiest visitors to your office the most.

    I've never had a drilled tank with a sump, but I've heard that they are not always the quietest thing around. A large Eheim canister is very quiet and (since you have a higher budget) I would think that this might be a consideration for an office.

    Kevin

  3. #3

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    I like both tang and malawi, I think for an office mbuna win out due to color and skitsophrenic personalities and your existing knowledge.
    The photocontest, like everything else is behind schedule. You get some links back today.

  4. #4
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    My home 180 has a HOB overflow to a sump, and USUALLY is very quiet. When it isn't, though, the noises it makes are not what I would want in my office . I hadn't thought about a canister, since I have never used one (other than the Mag 350 that I use for water polishing). My smaller tanks generally use Emperor HOBs, and other than at feeding time, these have been very quiet. I guess I'll have to take another look at some of the threads on favorite filter types...
    Luckiest guy on the planet.

  5. #5
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    Believe it or not, I forgot to include one of my questions. I'll have the office tank's lights on a timer, so that will not be an issue. During the week, I'll feed, but over the weekend, when I hope I will not always have to come in, should I just let the mbuna fast, or would it be better to use one of those automatic feeders? I'm leaning towards the fasting route...
    Luckiest guy on the planet.

  6. #6
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    let them fast.
    one fish, two fish, red fish, blue fish...omigod!! a whole lotta fish!!(mbuna tank)

    "Ya shark-toothed salmon! Ya hammer-headed halibut!"--Yosemite Sam

    "Ah hates dragons. Dragons is so dumb!--Yosemite Sam

  7. #7

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    ditto let them fast. And cannisters can be good if you don't want the noise of a sump.
    The photocontest, like everything else is behind schedule. You get some links back today.

  8. #8
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    I would let the fish fast. As far as the differences between Malawi and Tanganyika you really just have to keep the temps steady for the tangs that's about the biggest difference.

    If you opt for a sump system use 'durso' stand pipes they are silent and would work great in an office environment.
    _____________
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  9. #9
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    Originally posted by Solace
    ..If you opt for a sump system use 'durso' stand pipes they are silent and would work great in an office environment.
    Thanks! I've seen the design, which looks like it would be pretty easy to put together. If I go with a sump, I'll definitely use a durso standpipe. If my home standpipe really made much noise consistently, I would figure out a way to adapt it to that system, too.

    I almost forgot that I have a 75 in my bedroom that has a DIY (by previous owner) overflow/sump. This tank is home to a very shy Red Devil, a few raphael cats, a few Australian Rainbows (dithers), a banded pleco (beautiful, if you like a wood-eater), and a really amazing little (2-3") albino bristlenose pleco (courtesy of Chris on CAAS) that has stripped the tank of algae in a little over a week. I have "engineered" an el-cheapo silencer for the standpipe out of a plastic cup and some air line tubing. OK, I'm not certain it is responsible, but the sucking noise HAS disappeared...but I don't think that the plastic cup look would fly at the office . Another interesting feature on the bedroom 75 is that the overflow is kept very clean by a colony of ghost shrimp that escaped the fish in the tank by heading out the overflow...and the exterior box on the overflow is just too narrow for me to get my net into.

    I have pretty much decided to go with mbuna, at this point. I guess the clerk would stop suggesting Tanganyika if I broke it to him that I probably won't buy most of the fish from him.
    Last edited by fish speaker; 03-20-2005 at 06:02 PM.
    Luckiest guy on the planet.

  10. #10
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    I agree - stick with what you know. I ran my own aquarium maintenance business for 4 years, and here are my suggestions.

    1. Design for easiest maintenance as possible. If your tank at home gets a little sloppy looking no-one but you sees it. A dirty tank at the office is seen by everyone, and clients may look at this as a reflection of your overall business practices.

    2. Stay away from the auto-feeders - Fish will be fine over the weekend.

    3. I'd stick with the canister filter. They allow you to get the tank plenty close to the wall, don't require drilling, and the good ones provide plenty of options for media/ filtration types. Also, I always worry about leaks (especially in a business environment) and the added plumbing just makes me nervous.

    4. Duplication of mechanicals - I always use two undersized heaters and at least 2 filters. This has saved many a tank from "cooking" or being without filtration when problems arose over the weekend.

    5. Only one person allowed to do anything other than look at the tank. This probably won't be a problem since it is in your office, and I'm sure you will have the overall responsibilities of feeding/ maintaining the tank. But this can be a real problem in other locations. I once found out that 6 different people were feeding a tank I had set-up in a law office. Everyone said when they walked by, the fish must be starving because they came to the top and "begged"

    I wish I could use office funds to set-up another tank - Good Luck.

  11. #11
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    Thanks for the tips. I really had thought about the problem of others feeding (and killing) fish, and had already determined that nobody would be allowed to do anything to the tank without specific instructions from me. I'm a fairly easy guy to work for, and I think they would respect that instruction.

    The neatness concern is a real one, too, and is the biggest concern I've had. I will have to do a couple of glass scrapings per week, and vacuums/water changes (as I do at home, except that at home the glass can go for a while, if I'm pressed for time). If my home 180 mbuna tank is a good example of what I can expect, it should stay fairly neat-looking, as long as the glass is kept clear (the green poop doesn't really look like what it is ).

    I've decided to start with this one, and not even consider one for the reception area (which the staff wants, too) until I see how it goes for this one.

    Thanks,
    David
    Luckiest guy on the planet.

  12. #12
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    those are some great tips, Rockriverfish. and welcome!

    i, too, wish i could set up an office tank. i just don't know where i'd put it. i moved into a bigger (corner ) office about a year and a half ago, but it's newly redone and has all this modular furniture that i inherited and hate. it couldn't hold a tank. (it barely holds my puter, printer, monitor and docking port...)

    so, office mbuna tank. i'm so very jealous.

    you should try to get some pics and document the set up. this is a great thread and those of us who can't have fish at work can do a little vicarious fish keeping.
    Tiny purple fishes run laughing through your fingers

  13. #13
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    My only reservation at this point is that our lease is up for renewal in just over a year. If we decide to move to different offices, I will hire a lfs to move it (the one that I patronize advertises that they do this). Based on the space that I have freed up by rearranging my furniture, I can either go with a 90 w/HOB filtration, or a 120 w/sump or canister filtration. Time to start getting some quotes...
    Luckiest guy on the planet.

  14. #14
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    Yet another follow-up. As far as tank size is concerned, I hadn't even thought about a 6-foot tank, but would a 125 (72x18 footprint) provide any advantage over a 120 (48x24 footprint)? I'm assuming that the extra length would be better than the extra depth in minimizing aggression. I also haven't ruled out a 90, I'm just trying to make sure that when I start looking at prices, I know what will work best.

    Thanks,
    David
    Luckiest guy on the planet.

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