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thomas
09-07-2002, 01:17 PM
I have a 55 gal tank that has just finished cycling and am reaady to add some fish. I have heard that you should treat for ick whenever you add fish. I have an AC500 that I've only had for a couple of weeks and have both the sponge filter and the carbon insert in it right now. I know that I need to take the carbon out when medicating my tank. Is there any way I should store this carbon insert to put back in in a few days?

chennes
09-07-2002, 02:25 PM
If the carbon has been in for more than a few days, most of its effectiveness is gone anyway - you could leave it in with no ill effects on the treatment. Or, throw it away, since it's not doing much good anyway. I stopped using carbon altogether, and simply replaced its spot in my AC with another sponge.

Chris

SGypsyMermaid
09-08-2002, 09:02 AM
this is one of those areas where aquarists are divided. in my experience, carbon does not lose its efficacy in a few days, but rather continues to work for about a month. that being said--if you want to protect the bacteria in your carbon inserts, you need to put it into another tank, or a container with aeration and 'food' for the bacteria.

thomas
09-09-2002, 08:08 PM
I am not particularly worried about the bacteria in the carbon insert. Could I just store it in a ziplok bag of something?

SGypsyMermaid
09-09-2002, 08:18 PM
if you're not worried about the bacteria, then it probably doesn't matter where or how you store it.

Cichlid Jeans
09-10-2002, 07:40 AM
My $0.02: Changing the water parameters for fish -- introducing fish to a new tank -- may stress them and reduce the effectiveness of their slime coatings and other elements of their immune systems. This will give low level pathogens already in the fish a chance to take off. Nevertheless, I wouldn't treat a tank for ich or other parasites unless the fish show ich. Formaldehyde and malachite green aren't health food. They're less evil than the parasites you're treating for, but they remain harmful in themselves.

Carbon as a biological filtration medium? Hmm...possibly. The purpose of the carbon is to rip out chemicals that bacteria won't eat. If you have good quality (truly microporous) carbon in sufficient quantity -- e.g. 4-6 oz. on your 55 gal.-- I think it will remain effective for at least 10 days of filtration. I'm basing that on "analog" experience -- I don't know when the carbon ceases acting as a chemical sponge, but I notice it has reduced impact on visible parameters after 10 days so I chuck it. You'd want to spread those days out over a period of a month or so.

So..... whatcha putting in that tank?

Cichlid Jeans

thomas
09-10-2002, 07:42 PM
I just got three yellow labs and a medium Plecostomus this weekend. Still kinda trying to decide what else. Will probably add a trio of Lemon Jakes soon. I hope. The problem is I want to buy juveniles, but I don't really know enough about sexing them or if they can be sexed. I thought this one particular lfs might be pretty good, but I don't know yet. The only one who seems to know very much about cichlids is the owner and he wasn't there this weekend. Would it be a real problem to add a trio of cichlids if they were all males or 2male/1female (juveniles)?

chennes
09-10-2002, 08:32 PM
All males is no problem. Two females and one male is probably no problem. Two males and one female is probably a problem, at least it was for me. And watch out for the labs - they breed like rabbits!!

Chris

chennes
09-10-2002, 08:33 PM
Oh yeah, and when they're juveniles, it's usually impossible to sex them.

Chris

jnorris
09-26-2002, 09:55 PM
The solution to this is to get a small tank to use as a quarentine tank. That will prevent you from getting most parasites and may also provide you with a breeding tank when you are well stocked.

The key to this is to try to keep this tank to the same parameters as your other (tanks).

A 15-20 gallon works great for this......