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View Full Version : Carbon -- Life Expectancy



stoopid
03-16-2004, 10:20 AM
I'm new to adding my own carbon to my filtration system, so I'm not sure how often it needs to be replaced.

I'm referring to the black diamond carbon I add to the powerhead filter.

Rudy
03-16-2004, 10:33 AM
30 days is what they say. 30 minutes is what I say. Carbon has limited suface area that gets used up pretty quickly.

stoopid
03-16-2004, 10:35 AM
It's been 2 weeks, I think I'll do it tonight :)

It's not like carbon's expensive, so if you recommend it be changed often then it's probably not a bad idea (better safe then sorry, right? :) ).

Rudy
03-16-2004, 10:41 AM
Honestly Stoopid I don't believe it should be used for anything than removing meds from a tank.

What are you using it for?

stoopid
03-16-2004, 11:17 AM
Originally posted by Rudy
Honestly Stoopid I don't believe it should be used for anything than removing meds from a tank.

What are you using it for?

My existing filter (Regent 30-60) that came with the 55g is pretty poor, using the powerhead to aerate the tank and the carbon to assist in processing some of the residual junk in the water.

Since I started using the powerhead and carbon my water's gone from really clear to crystal clear.

Seedy
03-16-2004, 05:44 PM
Stoopid...when you change your carbon (assuming your still going to do so) only change about 50% of it so that you leave some bacteria on the old carbon as "seed"...To be honest with you, after the first few days or a week or so, your carbon isn't really absorbing much, it's really being used for surface area by your "good" bacteria...

stoopid
03-17-2004, 09:26 AM
Thanks seedy. I didn't get to it last night, may not this evening either, but when I finally do I will keep that in mind.

Seedy
03-17-2004, 04:25 PM
I would like to propose an experiment to "settle" this issue... Why don't a number of us, using the same equipment, conduct an eperiment on the absortive properties of carbon. We could choose a brand of carbon, a commonly available filter or pump, add a controlled amount ofamonia daily to a controlled amount of water and measure the ppm. We could then plot ammonia levels against time and get a reasonable answer as to how long carbon actually 'works' for.

If any body is interested in talking specifics...let me know...I have allready come up with some ideas (and began crunching numbers to get the ppms in a readable range of standard reagent tests kits)